Search DubaiPRNetwork.com

Home >> Entertainment

Twitter reveals data on the impact of the 280-character launch one year on

Tuesday, October 30, 2018/ Editor -  

Share

Home >> Entertainment

80%+ and 50%+ rise seen in the use of words such as ÇáÑÌÇÁ (please) and  áæ ÓãÍÊ  (excuse me) in Arabic
 
Dubai, United Arab Emirates, October 30, 2018:  It’s been a year since Twitter introduced the 280-character limit to the platform from 140 characters, making it easier for people around the world to express themselves in a single Tweet. With a goal to continue to deliver a platform for people to connect and share news and views, the objective was to ensure the brevity and speed Twitter is known for was not lost. One year later, on the launch’s first anniversary, Twitter has released data surrounding the impact of the 280-character limit. 

In the past year, the language used across the world has evolved. When analyzing seven languages, Twitter found that since the doubling of the character limit, there has been a rise in the use of words such as ‘please’ (+54%) and ‘thank you’ (+22%). In Arabic, there’s been an 83%, 56%, 44% and 30% rise in the use of   ÇáÑÌÇÁ (please), áæ ÓãÍÊ (excuse me), ÔßÑÇ (thank you), and  ÃÑÌæß (please) respectively. The use of abbreviations has also declined in favor of proper words. English abbreviations such as ‘gr8’ (-36%), ‘b4’ (-13%) and ‘sry’ (-5%) declined in favour of ‘great’ (+32%) ‘before’ (+70%), and ‘sorry’ (+31%).  

The new data revealed that it's easier to Tweet and Twitter is still brief. The most common length of Tweets remains small — with 140 characters it was 34 characters in English and 30 characters in Arabic, and with 280 characters it is 33 characters in English and still 30 characters in Arabic. Historically, 9% of English Tweets and 4% of Arabic Tweets hit the 140-character limit. This reflected the challenge of fitting a thought into a Tweet, often resulting in editing to fit within the limit. With the expanded 280 character count one year later, about 1% of Tweets in both English and Arabic are hitting the 280-character limit. 12% and 5% of English and Arabic Tweets sent after the expanded 280 character count are over 140 characters respectively. Globally, Twitter saw 6% of all Tweets over 140 characters and 3% of Tweets over 190 characters. This indicates that less work is needed to fit thoughts into Tweets and short Tweets remain the norm.

In addition, more questions and conversations are taking place on the platform. The number of Tweets with a question mark ‘?’ has increased by 30% and overall, Tweets are receiving more replies.


Previous in Entertainment

Next in Entertainment


Home >> Entertainment Section

Latest Press Release

Deloitte and DOC: OSS industry to exceed US$ 1.0 trillion, within the next 6 yea ...

Emirates Islamic announces first 5 lucky Tesla winners of Kunooz savings account ...

Swiss Ambassador in the UAE visits the Swiss International Scientific School in ...

For Those Who Desire a Modish Mobile, HONOR 20 Moschino Edition will be the High ...

Ulissi Takes a Podium Place at La Fleche Wallone

2020 Genesis G90 Luxury Flagship Sedan Enters the Middle East

High achievers at Emirates International Schools rewarded

A Century of Innovation: the Bentley S2 Continental Flying Spur

Tory Burch Collection: Spring/Summer 2019

2019 Shortlist Announced for Aga Khan Award for Architecture

IKEA Dazzles Crowds With Stunning Fashion Show Showcasing Its Latest Sustainable ...

Adequate information about IVF pregnancy is key to a successful conception

The Beard Gear Company

Al Maya receives Certificate of Appreciation from USDA

Grappling with hair fall? VIERRO to the Rescue

Al-Futtaim Trading Enterprises Honda technician to represent Middle East region ...

First batch of Aster Homes handed over to the flood victims in Kerala

Young artists take centre stage at 5th Annual Toyota Dream Car Art Contest

Dark Matter detector observes universe's rarest decay process ever measured

His Excellency Sheikh Nahyan Bin Mubarak Al Nahyan, Uae Minister of Tolerance, O ...